World News

Woolly mammoth bones found in Mexico shed light on hunting ritual

The first artificial traps for mammoths have been discovered in Tultepec, Mexico, said Luis Cordoba Barradas, one of the archaeological rescue direction of the National Institute of Anthropology and Mexico History. November 6, 2019

At least 14 skeletons of woolly mammoths have been discovered in Mexico in pits apparently built by human hunters to trap and kill the huge animals some 15,000 years ago, according to Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History.

The discovery “represents a watershed, a touchstone on what we imagined until now was the interaction of hunter-gatherer bands with these enormous herbivores,” Pedro Francisco Sánchez Nava, national coordinator of archaeology at INAH, told reporters on Wednesday.

The skeletons were found in Tultepec, about 25 miles north of Mexico City, in clay that had once been at the bottom of Lake Xaltocan.

Archaeologist Luis Cordoba Barradas, of INAH’s Directorate of Archaeological Rescue, said the discovery offers a more complex and complete concept of how mammoth hunts were carried out. 

Archaeologists suggested that the clay area had opened up as the lake receded during the era of mammoths, providing hunters with a site easier to dig up to create traps.


Source link

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button
Close
Close